Long residence applications include application for ILR on the basis of 10 years long residence, further leave to remain application on the basis of 10 years long residence and applications on the basis of 20 years long residence. The immigration rules on long residence recognise the importance of ties a person may form with the UK over a lengthy period of residence in the UK.

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Specialist Immigration Solicitors For Long Residence Applications

Our immigration solicitors are specialists for applications based on long residence. As one of the best long residence solicitors, we have successfully helped thousands of clients with their applications for stay in the UK including permanent stay based on long residence. Our highly experienced and fully qualified long residence solicitors can provide fast, friendly, reliable and fixed fee immigration advice and legal representations for your application based on long residence. 

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Applications Based On Long Residence

As specialist long residence solicitors, we can provide fast, friendly and reliable fixed fee legal services for following applications on the basis of long residence in the UK:

FAQs - Long Residence Applications

The long residence applications include application for ILR on the basis of 10 years long residence, further leave to remain application on the basis of 10 years long residence and applications on the basis of 20 years long residence.

Before 9 July 2012, it was possible to grant ILR under the long residence provisions after a period of 14 years continuous residence, but that provision was removed by changes to the Immigration Rules on 9 July 2012. It is therefore no longer possible to apply for ILR under 14 years long residence since 2012.

You can challenge the refusal of your long residence application by filing an appeal to the First Tier Tribunal (FTT) within 14 days of the refusal decision. If your human rights claim based on long residence has been certified as manifestly unfounded and you have not been given an in-country right of appeal, you can challenge the certification decision by way of Judicial Review. 

The 10 years long residence is based and continuous and lawful residence in the UK for 10 years whereas 20 years long residence is continuous residence for 20 years whether lawfully, unlawfully or combination of both lawful and unlawful residence. As a result of 10 years long residence, the applicant is normally granted Indefinite Leave to Remain (ILR) whereas on the basis of 20 years long residence initial application, the applicant is granted 30 months leave to remain under the 10 years route to settlement.

For the purposes of paragraphs 276B to 276D of the Immigration Rules, “continuous residence” means residence in the United Kingdom for an unbroken period, and for these purposes a period shall not be considered to have been broken where an applicant is absent from the United Kingdom for a period of 6 months or less at any one time, provided that the applicant in question has existing limited leave to enter or remain upon their departure and return, but shall be considered to have been broken if the applicant:

  • has been removed under Schedule 2 of the 1971 Act, section 10 of the 1999 Act, has been deported or has left the United Kingdom having been refused leave to enter or remain here; or
  • has left the United Kingdom and, on doing so, evidenced a clear intention not to return; or
  • left the United Kingdom in circumstances in which he could have had no reasonable expectation at the time of leaving that he would lawfully be able to return; or
  • has been convicted of an offence and was sentenced to a period of imprisonment or was directed to be detained in an institution other than a prison (including, in particular, a hospital or an institution for young offenders), provided that the sentence in question was not a suspended sentence; or
  • has spent a total of more than 18 months absent from the United Kingdom during the period in question.

According to UK immigration rules, "lawful residence” means residence which is continuous residence pursuant to:

  • existing leave to enter or remain, except this cannot include time with entry clearance or permission under Appendix V: Visitor, Appendix Short-term Student (English language), or Appendix Temporary work – Seasonal Worker, or any relevant predecessor routes; or
  • an exemption from immigration control, including where an exemption ceases to apply if it is immediately followed by a grant of leave to enter or remain.

“lawful residence” does not include time spent on immigration bail, temporary admission, or temporary release.

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